Resources by Level: College and Graduate

Risk Factors

Slide Sets and Presentations

The following selection of slide sets and presentations can be downloaded for use by the general public. Please see individual annotations for more information about a particular set of slides and recommended audience.

  1. Harvard School of Public Health - Means Matter Campaign
    The site offers slide set presentations about lethal means restriction suicide prevention campaigns as well as materials regarding the importance of addressing suicide means. The site has sections about facts, taking action, FAQs, programs, bibliography, useful links, and a section with brochures and presentations available for download. The site contains a presentation about lethal means restriction.
    The entire presentation could be shortened or used as is and is appropriate for high school and undergraduate level audiences
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  2. Harvard School Public Health - Bridge Barriers
    This slide set contains pictures of bridge barriers around the country. In addition, a few slides contain data correlating the installation of bridge barriers to suicide rates. To find this presentation, click on the following link and select Pictures.
    The entire presentation could be shortened or used as is for college or high school level audiences
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  3. Struggling in Silence - Physician Depression additional Resources
    This website contains the resource guide and slide set to accompany the DVD (Struggling in Silence). The slide set is 29 slides with detailed information, including discussion questions, facts, risk factors, and other materials relevant to physician depression. The AFSP seeks to educate physicians about depression so that they can better recognize the symptoms in themselves and their patients while also cultivating a better understanding of mood disorders in the community at large. This video is 54 minutes.
    This is appropriate for graduate and medical level educators as well as health professionals.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  4. Suicide and Out of the Silence - Medical Student Depression and Suicide
    The website contains 2 slide sets to accompany the film Medical Student Depression and Suicide. Resource links connect to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention resources.
    Appropriate for graduate and medical level educators as well as health professionals
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  5. Suicide in the Military
    This is a 50 slide presentation by John Rodolico, Ph.D based out of Harvard. Presentation focuses on demographics of new veterans, military studies and interventions, as well as military culture and suicide.
    This is appropriate for those who interact with military personnel in their work and/or classroom environments.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  6. Suicide Prevention among LGBT Youth: A Workshop for Professionals Who Serve Youth
    This presentation is designed to assist staff in schools, youth-serving organizations, and suicide prevention programs take action to reduce suicidal behavior among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Topics covered include suicidal behavior among LGBT youth, risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior, strategies to reduce risk, and ways to increase school or agency cultural competence.
    The workshop includes lecture, small group exercises, and group discussion. All of these can be adapted to meet the needs of diverse audiences.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  7. Suicide Prevention for Adolescents
    Click on 5th bullet for a presentation entitled "Suicide Prevention: Providing Sanctuary for Adolescents in Crisis, Mass Dept of Mental Health Tewksbury, MA". This suicide prevention presentation has 46 slides on suicide prevention for adolescents developed by Dr. Nancy Rappaport at Cambridge Hospital. It covers statistics, means, risk factors, psychological components (depression and mood disorders), as well as strategies for prevention.
    This is appropriate for college or graduate level learners: components could be adapted for a high school level audience.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  8. Suicide Prevention: Saving Lives One Community at a Time
    This presentation contains facts sheets, statistics and risk factors for depression and suicide, dispels popular myths on the subject, and highlights the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention's (AFSP) research and education programs. It also provides advice to individuals who are faced with someone in their life who may be contemplating suicide.
    The presentation could be shortened or used as is for high school and college level educators.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
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Publications

  1. A Prioritized Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention: An Action Plan to Save Lives
    A Prioritized Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention: An Action Plan to Save Lives, which outlines the research areas that show the most promise in helping to reduce the rates of suicide attempts and deaths in the next 5-10 years, if optimally implemented. As a companion piece to the Prioritized Research Agenda, the RPTF also developed a Suicide Research Prioritization Plan of Action, which outlines the research pathways and short- and long-term objectives presented in the full Prioritized Research Agenda.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  2. Adolescent Health Case Studies
    This document contains two brief case studies, one regarding access to confidential care and the other regarding access to mental health services for adolescents. This 5 page document was put together for an adolescent health discussion and contains brief summary statistics with Rhode Island data.
    This is recommended for use at the graduate and medical school level.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  3. Adoption as a Risk Factor for Attempted Suicide During Adolescence
    Depression, impulsivity, and aggression during adolescence have been associated with both adoption and suicidal behavior. Studies of adopted adults suggest that impulsivity, even more than depression, may be an inherited factor that mediates suicidal behavior. However, the association between adoption and adolescent suicide attempts and the mechanisms that might explain it remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the following: 1) whether suicide attempts are more common among adolescents who live with adoptive parents rather than biological parents; 2) whether the association is mediated by impulsivity, and 3) whether family connectedness decreases the risk of suicide attempt regardless of adoptive or biological status. Adoption as a Risk Factor for Attempted Suicide During Adolescence Gail Slap, MD; Elizabeth Goodman, MD; and Bin Huang, MS Pediatrics Vol. 108 No. 2 August 1, 2001 pp. e30 (doi: 10.1542/peds.108.2.e30)
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  4. Assessing the risk factors for suicidal thoughts at a nontraditional commuter school. Gillman JL1, Kim HS, Alder SC, Durrant LH. J Am Coll Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;55(1):17-26.
    The sample of students completing the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) Survey at the University of Utah differs from the national reference group for the NCHA 2003 in age, employment, residence, and marital status. The purpose of this study is to determine if the defining characteristics of a commuter school increase the risk for suicidal thoughts.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  5. Associations between bullying and engaging in aggressive and suicidal behaviors among sexual minority youth: The moderating role of connectedness.
    This study examined associations between experiencing cyber and school bullying and engaging in aggressive and suicidal behaviors among sexual minority youth, they also explored whether feeling connected to an adult at school moderated these associations. The findings highlight the challenges faced by bullied lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth. Practitioners should work with school administrators to establish supportive environments for sexual minority youth. Helping victimized LGB youth develop meaningful connections with adults at school can minimize the negative impacts of cyber and school bullying. Duong, J. & Bradshaw, C. (2014). Associations between bullying and engaging in aggressive and suicidal behaviors among sexual minority youth: The moderating role of connectedness. Journal of School Health 84(10), 636-645.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  6. Familial transmission of suicidal behavior
    Suicide and suicidal behavior is highly familial, and appears to be familially transmitted independently from the familial transmission of psychiatric disorder per se (1). Adoption, twin, and family studies support the view that the etiology of the familial transmission of suicidal behavior is at least in part genetic, and may be mediated by the transmission of intermediate phenotypes, such as impulsive aggression. Brent, D.A. & Melhem, N. (2008). Familial transmission of suicidal behavior. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 31, 157-177.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  7. Family history of suicide, female sex, and childhood trauma: separate or interacting risk factors for attempts at suicide?
    Female sex, childhood trauma, and a family history of suicidal behavior are three well established risk factors for attempting suicide. However, interactions between these three factors in attempting suicide have been little studied. One thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine abstinent substance dependent patients were interviewed about their lifetime and family history of suicidal behavior and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Gender, family history of suicidal behavior, and CTQ scores--and their interaction--were examined in relation to suicidal behavior. Roy, A. A., & Janal, M. M. (2005). Family history of suicide, female sex, and childhood trauma: separate or interacting risk factors for attempts at suicide?. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 112(5), 367-371. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2005.00647.x
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  8. Immigration generation status and its association with suicide attempts, substance use, and depressive symptoms among latino adolescents in the USA.
    This study investigated the relation between suicide attempts and immigrant generation status using the Latino subset of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a school-based, nationally representative sample. This study also examined whether generation status predicted risk factors associated with elevated suicide behaviors, namely illicit substance use, problematic alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Finally, hypothesizing that elevated depressive symptoms and substance use mediate the relation between immigrant generation status and suicide attempts among Latino adolescents, a path model was tested. Peña, J.B., Wyman, P.A., Hendricks Brown, C.. Matthieu, M.M., Olivares, T.E., Hartel, D., & Zayas, L.H. (2008). Immigration generation status and its association with suicide attempts, substance use, and depressive symptoms among Latino adolescents in the USA. Prevention Science, 9(4), 299-301.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  9. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescent School Victimization: Implications for Young Adult Health and Adjustment. Russell, S., Ryan, C., Toomey, R., Diaz, R., & Sanchez, J. (2011). Journal of School Health, 81(5), 223-230.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  10. Multi-Level Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation Among at-Risk Adolescent Females
    Multi-Level Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation Among at-Risk Adolescent Females: The Roleof Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Responses to Stress Matteo Giletta & Casey D. Calhoun & Paul D. Hastings & Karen D. Rudolph & Matthew K. Nock & Mitchell J. Prinstein
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  11. Peer Involvement in Campus-Based Suicide Prevention: Key Considerations
    This 27 page guidance document was developed by The Campus Suicide Prevention Center of Virginia and discusses the merits and main points to take into account for the role of students in preventing suicides on their campus. This document talks about suicide statistics among college aged youth, the importance of peer support, model programs, and how to create safe and effective peer involvement.
    This resource is appropriate for undergraduate educators and advisers as well as for school administration or college students looking to build a peer suicide prevention program on their campus.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  12. Preventing suicide: A global imperative.
    First WHO report on suicide prevention. World Health Organization calls for coordinated action to reduce suicides worldwide. World Health Organization. (2014). Preventing suicide: A global imperative. Geneva: WHO Press. Read Pages 10-25.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  13. Reducing a suicidal person’s access to lethal means of suicide: A research agenda.
    Reducing the availability of highly lethal and commonly used suicide methods has been associated with declines in suicide rates of as much as 30%â€"50% in other countries. The theory and evidence underlying means restriction is outlined. Most evidence of its efficacy comes from population-level interventions and natural experiments. In the U.S., where 51% of suicides are completed with firearms and household firearm ownership is common and likely to remain so, reducing a suicidal person’s access to firearms will usually be accomplished not by fiat or other legislative initiative but rather by appealing to individual decision, for example, by counseling at-risk people and their families to temporarily store household firearms away from home or otherwise making household firearms inaccessible to the at-risk person until they have recovered. Miller, M.J.. & Barber, C. W. (2014). Reducing a suicidal person’s access to lethal means of suicide: A research agenda. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47(3), Supplement 2, S264-S272.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  14. Sexual Orientation and Suicide Ideation, Plans, Attempts, and Medically Serious Attempts
    Sexual orientation and suicide ideation, plans, attempts, and medically serious attempts: evidence from local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2001-2009. We examined the associations between 2 measures of sexual orientation and 4 suicide risk outcomes (SROs) from pooled local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. Stone, D. M., Feijun, L., Lijing, O., Lippy, C., Hertz, M. F., & Crosby, A. E. (2014). Sexual Orientation and Suicide Ideation, Plans, Attempts, and Medically Serious Attempts: Evidence From Local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 2001-2009. American Journal of Public Health, 104(2), 262-271. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301383
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  15. Suicide Among Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders. Suicide Prevention Action Network (SPAN) and Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
    This fact sheet discusses suicide data and ethnic suicide risk and protective factors among the Asian American/Pacific Islander population.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  16. Suicide Among Racial/Ethnic Populations in the U.S.: Hispanics. Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC).
    This fact sheet analyzes data and research on suicidal behavior among Hispanics in the United States.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  17. Suicide and suicidal behavior. Epidemiologic Reviews
    Suicidal behavior is a leading cause of injury and death worldwide. Information about the epidemiology of such behavior is important for policy-making and prevention. The authors reviewed government data on suicide and suicidal behavior and conducted a systematic review of studies on the epidemiology of suicide published from 1997 to 2007. The authors' aims were to examine the prevalence of, trends in, and risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior in the United States and cross-nationally. Nock, MK, Borges, G, Bromet, EJ, Cha, CB, Kessler, RC, & Lee, S (2008). Suicide and suicidal behavior. Epidemiologic Reviews, 30, 133-154. doi: Doi 10.1093/Epirev/Mxn002
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  18. Suicide Rates for African Americans and Caucasians, 1999-2010. American Association of Suicidology.
    This fact sheet compares suicide data between African Americans and American Caucasians, mostly focusing on data in the African American population. In addition, it provides suggestions to the reader on strategies to decrease the suicide rates in his or her community.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  19. The Relationship Between Bullying and Suicide: What We Know and What it Means for Schools. (2014). CDC: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Division of Violence Prevention.
    This article discusses the close relationship between bullying and suicide among American youth. This publication presents facts, statistics, prevention tips and a resource list for educators. Including an additional reading section where educators can find resources examining the connection between bullying and suicide.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
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Courses and Training Materials

This section includes a variety of material about suicide prevention courses and trainings. For the high school level, selected material consists of workshops and online modules. At the college and graduate levels, there is material on suicide prevention, as well as on related topics, such as risk factors, depression, and mental illness. Also listed are course syllabi from professors who presently include suicide prevention in their courses. The section for care providers is recommended for clinicians and health care providers of all types.

  1. American Association of Suicidology (AAS) Clinical Assessment and Management Recommended Reading
    The American Association of Suicidology lists recommended texts with a brief summary of each.
    The books recommended are scholarly texts and geared towards clinicians and psychologists for assessing and managing suicide risk.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  2. Depression and Suicide: Risk Factors, Diagnosis, and Treatment
    Nurse.com describes the goal of its psychiatric nursing course to assist healthcare professionals in recognizing depression and to identify supportive measures to help patients and their loved ones decrease the risk of suicide.
    This is appropriate for the graduate and medical school level, as well as professionals and workers from the health field.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  3. Griffith University, Australia Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention
    Suicide Prevention Skills Training Workshops for preventing suicide in young people, workers from health, education, community, emergency, youth, and corrective services sectors.
    This is recommended for professionals working with youth and workers from health, education and community fields.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  4. Harvard School of Public Health Online Course
    The Harvard School of Public Health offers two courses created by the Means Matter staff and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center- Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) and The Research Evidence for Suicide as a Preventable Public Health Issue. These courses are eligible for continuing education credits.
    This is appropriate for college and graduate level educators and health professionals.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  5. Indiana University Course - Suicide and Depression (B399)
    Dr. Daniel Debrule at Indiana University South Bend teaches an undergraduate level psychology course, Suicide and Depression. The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the topics, issues, research, and literature on suicidology, with a special consideration of the relationship between suicide and depression.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  6. Injury Control Research Centers
    Injury Control Research Centers (ICRC) are hosted through a research institution (hospital or university typically) and conduct research in the three core phases of injury control (prevention, acute care, and rehabilitation) and serve as training centers as well as information centers for the public. Not all ICRC's conduct suicide prevention work specifically (though many do). Currently funded ICRC's include Emory, UNC-Chapel Hill, John Hopkins School of Public Health, University of Iowa, San Francisco Injury Center and more. Links are provided to each institution's research center homepage for an overview of their work.
    This resource is appropriate for college, graduate, and medical school level educators. This is also recommended for researchers.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  7. Mental Health First Aid
    Mental Health First Aid offers trainings designed to provide information on depression, mood and anxiety disorders, trauma, psychosis, and substance use disorders. Participants will receive instructions on ways to help a person developing a mental health disorder or in a crisis. Local courses are offered throughout the state of Rhode Island, and include regular training classes and train the trainer courses.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Screening Tools; Treatment and Referral;
  8. QPR Institute: QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention
    QPR stands for Question, Persuade and Refer, three steps taught during this course that can help prevent suicide. QPR is an emergency response to someone who is in crisis and needs an immediate intervention. Both individuals and organizations can enroll in this training. When the course is completed, participants are prepared to teach QPR to others.
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    Topics: Screening Tools; Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  9. suicideTALK
    suicideTALK is a 90-minute to half-day community-oriented program. The topics covered include mental health stigma, suicide prevention, and signs of depression. The goal of this in-person training is to increase community awareness of suicide and decrease taboo surrounding suicide.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  10. TEACH-VIP
    TEACH-VIP is a comprehensive violence and injury prevention and control curriculum, developed by the World Health Organization and a global network of experts, covering a wide range of topics, designed to be delivered as face-to-face training. Based on a comprehensive curriculum created by WHO, the course is designed for public health professionals; health care providers; staff of public health ministries and nongovernmental organizations; and students and faculty at schools of medicine, nursing, and public health.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  11. The Trevor Project: Lifeguard Workshop Program
    This program uses a structured, age-appropriate curriculum with trained facilitators to address topics including sexual orientation and gender identity, the impacts of language and behavior on LGBTQ youth and suicide prevention skills in schools. The Trevor Lifeguard Workshop Program is available free of charge to educators and youth service providers in California, New York and Philadelphia. Locations outside of these areas may be accommodated for a nominal fee to cover travel expenses of workshop facilitators. Call 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386).
    Appropriate for high school or college level, focused on issues surrounding LGBT populations.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
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Movies and DVDs

This section lists a selection of videos about suicide prevention. Please see individual annotations for more information about a particular video and recommended audience

  1. It Gets Better Project
    Created in September 2010 in response to youth suicide among LGBT population, author Dan Savage created a YouTube video with his partner Terry to inspire hope for young people facing harassment because of their sexual orientation. This website describes the project and includes a YouTube video of Dan Savage and his husband reflecting about their difficulties growing up along with more than 10,000 testimonials of LGBT persons.
    This is appropriate for high school and undergraduate level educators and parents; also recommended for those working with LGBT youth.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  2. Warning Signs for Suicide with Judy Bailey
    This companion to the resource "Risk Factors for Suicide with Judy Bailey" focuses on warning signs and is produced by SPINZ (Suicide Prevention Information New Zealand). This 5-minute resource is available on You Tube.
    This video is appropriate for high school and undergraduate level educators.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
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Websites

Below are listed the homepages for national suicide prevention organizations. These websites contain information for targeted as well as general audiences.

  1. American Association of Suicidology (AAS) Recommended Videos
    The American Association of Suicidology (AAS) issues a list of existing videos regarding various aspects of suicide and prevention with a short description of each.
    The videos listed are primarily about young people and are recommended for a variety of audiences and uses.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  2. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) List of Risk Factors
    The list is organized by distal (e.g. psychiatric disorders, demographics) and proximal (e.g. suicidal crisis, change in affect, and life events) risk factors. The list provides a rich description of the risk factors.
    Appropriate for undergraduate, graduate school educators, and for educators who teach aspiring health providers.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
    SAHMSA provides individuals, families, professionals, and organizations with information and resources to seek help, provide assistance, and/or implement suicide prevention programs in their communities.
    This is useful for college, graduate or medical school level.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral;
  4. Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
    SPRC supports the nation's mental health infrastructure by providing states, government agencies, private organizations, colleges and universities, and suicide survivor and mental health consumer groups with access to resources that can bolster efforts to develop programs, implement intervention and promote policies to prevent suicide.
    This appropriate for all audiences.
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    Topics: Treatment and Referral; Risk Factors;
  5. Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) Best Practice Registry - Section I: Evidence Based Programs
    This website provides a list of the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) in several categories: Education and Training, Treatment (Psychotherapies), Screening, Guidelines and Protocols, and Education and Training (Screening). It includes a description of the program, areas of interest, target outcomes, implementation history, adaptations, and adverse events.
    This is recommended for educators, professionals or researchers who want information about evidence-based programs.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Treatment and Referral; Screening Tools;
  6. University of Michigan Depression Center
    The University of Michigan Depression center provides useful information regarding mental health disorders and suicide.
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    Topics: Risk Factors; Screening Tools; Treatment and Referral;
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Statistics

These sets of statistics represent commonly cited, public sources of data related to suicide, injury, and mental health. A statistical programming package (SAS/STATA/SPSS) is recommended. Recommended Audience and Setting: This material is recommended primarily for researchers, educators at the college, graduate, and medical school level ,and health professionals.

  1. CDC WONDER
    WONDER online databases utilize a rich ad-hoc query system for the analysis of public health data.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  2. National Suicide Statistics
    The American Association of Suicidology prepares a series of data reports based on the National Vital Statistics Reports from the National Center for Health Statistics. The most current data available is from 2009. These reports are short and can be used to provide state, regional, and national level information on suicide deaths and rates as well as gender and age specific rates.
    This is appropriate for educators.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  3. National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS)
    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) database, includes information on deaths resulting from homicide, suicide, legal intervention, deaths of undetermined intent, and unintentional deaths involving firearms. It is based on a surveillance system that collects information from law enforcement, coroners and medical examiners, vital statistics and crime laboratories.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  4. Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) Datasheets
    Links to CDC fact sheet with data on suicide and attempts resulting in hospitalization connected with suicides and suicide attempts.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  5. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)
    An interactive system providing injury-related mortality data (including data on suicides and self-inflicted injuries) as mortality reports, leading causes of death reports, and years of potential life lost reports. These reports can be generated by state, age group, and ethnicity. WISQARS can generate similar data tables for nonfatal injuries.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;
  6. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS)
    The YRBSS was developed to monitor priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. Conducted biennially since 1991, it draws on representative samples of students in grades 9-12. The survey includes questions about young people who attempted or seriously considered suicide, as well as those who had made a suicide plan or suffered from depression.
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    Topics: Risk Factors;