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Surendra Sharma, MD, PHD

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Title: Professor of Pediatrics (Research)
Department: Pediatrics

Surendra_Sharma@brown.edu
+1 401 2741122 48004

 
Overview | Research | Grants/Awards |

The Sharma laboratory has a multifaceted research program focused on answering the question of why some women are predisposed to pregnancy complications. We believe that these problems may originate from abnormal immune and hormonal responses during pregnancy. The hypothesis is that anti-inflammatory intrauterine milieu controlled by cytokines and pregnancy hormones is crucial to fetal development and pregnancy success.

Biography

Dr. Sharma is Professor of Pediatrics at Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island and Deputy Director of Center of Biomedical Research Excellence for Perinatal Biology. Dr. Sharma has been involved in the Pathobiology and MCB graduate programs of Brown University. He was a member of the founding Steering Committee of Pathobiology Graduate Program and currently serves on the committee. His research interests focus on the biology of pregnancy complications with emphasis on immunobiology, predictive and diagnostic biomarkers, inflammation, and vascular pathogenesis. He has trained a number of PhD, post-doctoral and clinical fellows and has served on numerous review panels of NIH and ADA. He served as President of the American Society for Reproductive Immunology (2010-2012) and has organized several international and national conferences focusing on Reproductive Immunology.

Institutions

Wih

Research Description

Dr. Surendra Sharma is Professor and Deputy Director of Center of Biomedical Research Excellence at Women and Infants Hospital—Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. He is an internationally known investigator in the field of Immune Programming of Pregnancy and Associated Disorders and was recently awarded the Honorary Doctor of Medicine Degree from Linkoping University Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping, Sweden. He serves as a permanent member on review boards for the NIH and the American Diabetes Association as well as on editorial boards of several journals. His academic interests are as follows. Gestational outcomes are programmed at the time of implantation and during early pregnancy, apparently in defiance of the normal immunological laws of tissue transplantation. The process of normal implantation and early pregnancy success is regulated by exquisite integration and coordination of an array of biological processes. The molecular basis of this roadmap is diverse and not fully understood. The Sharma laboratory has a multifaceted research program focused on answering the question of why some women are predisposed to pregnancy complications. We believe that these problems may originate from abnormal immune and hormonal responses during pregnancy. The hypothesis is that anti-inflammatory intrauterine milieu controlled by cytokines and pregnancy hormones is crucial to fetal development and pregnancy success.

Awards

The Honorary Doctor of Medicine Lecture to Faculty of Health Sciences
Linkoping University Hospital, SWEDEN, May 11, 2006.

Affiliations

American Association of Immunologists, 1999-Present

American Society for Reproductive Immunology, 2001-Present

American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1999-Present

American Society for Reproductive Medicine, 2003-Present

Administrative:
Counselor to the Board, American Society for Reproductive Immunology, 2003-2006

President, American Society for Reproductive Immunology, 2010-2012

Funded Research

Completed:

RO1-HD41701-01
NIH/NICHD
Principal Investigator: Surendra Sharma 15%
Polymorphisms in IL-10 Locus Predispose to Preterm Birth
Period: 09/01/2002-08/31/2007 $257,000/yr
The major goal of this project is to investigate the etiology of
Preterm births with a focus on the incidence in African American population.
These studies will focus on the immunogenetic role of IL-10 in this pregnancy disorder.

RO 1-HL65719-01A1
NIH/NHLBI
Principal Investigator: Jack Nassau (S. Sharma, Women & Infants Principal Investigator) 10%
Stress and Immunity in Pediatric Asthma
Period: 07/01/2002-06/30/2005 $260,000/yr
The major goal of this project is to investigate the effect of stress on the immune
function in pediatric asthma patients.

1 P20 RR018728-01
NIH
Principal Investigator: James Padbury (S. Sharma, Deputy Director) 5%

1-04-TLG-14
American Diabetes Association
Principal Investigator: Surendra Sharma 10%
Immune Programming of Gestational Diabetes (1-04-TLG-14)
Period: 01/01/2004-12/31/2007 $100,000/yr
The major goals of this project are to examine the mutually inclusive roles of
placental development, IL-10, and glucose in normal and GDM pregnancy providing
insights into the immune and cytokine programming of GDM.

NICHD 02025
NIH
Co-Investigator: Surendra Sharma 10%
Research on Scope & Causes of Stillbirth in the United States
Period: 09/26/2003-09/25/2008 $846,000
The major goals of the proposal are to establish a tissue bank for stillbirth deliveries
and to study the pathogenesis of stillbirth.


N0-1HD-2-3342, Sub-contract WSU05056, Perinatology Branch, NICHD, NIH and Detroit
PI: Surendra Sharma
Effect of Ascending Infections on Birth—A Mouse Model
Period: 09/01/2005-08/31/2007 $79,000/year
This project focuses on establishing a mouse model to study the role of ascending
infections in the female genital tract on the incidence of preterm birth.

Current:

COBRE for Perinatal Biology
Period: 10/01/2003-09/30/2008 $1,570,000/yr
The major goals of this project are to increase our understanding of cardiopulmonary
development, immune programming of pregnancy, and help to develop strategies
for new therapeutic interventions by defining how several of these events impact
fetal and newborn development.

P42ES013660-01
NIEHS Superfund Projects
Project Leader: Surendra Sharma
State-based Approach to Complex Exposures (PI: Kim Boekelhiede)
Sub Project: Genetic Stress and Toxicant-Induced Pregnancy Disruption
Period: 01/01/2005-12/31/2014 $219,592/yr
This project focuses on the influence of environmental toxicants on pregnancy
outcome in mice genetically disrupted at cytokine loci.